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Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund on Spitsbergen under the project LPO arkitekter.

information:

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

New Alesund is a research village on the Norwegian archipelago Spitsbergen, the northernmost civil settlement on the planet; there are about thirty permanent residents, their number of grows to 120 in the summer. It was founded in 1917 as a miner, but in 1960 coal mining was stopped, and New Alesund was redesigned from mining to scientific. At the moment, there are sixteen research stations, which are managed by scientists from ten countries. The new Earth Observatory, founded by Kartverket, the Norwegian Cartography Office, with the support of NASA, became the 17th on this list.

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Observatory is the last element of the global network of geodetic stations and navigation satellite systems. This Arctic station will produce high-precision time measurements, help track changes in the ice cover, improve the efficiency of shipping, calculate the exact distance to orbiting satellites and much more. The main tool that must fulfill all of the above is the newest laser telescope provided by NASA. To design a form for such high-tech content was entrusted to the Spitsbergen office of the LPO arkitekten bureau.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

The Earth Observatory consists of five main objects: the control room of the station, two receiving antennas of radio telescopes, a laser telescope and a gravimeter. The station, antennas and telescope are connected by covered transitions and form in the plan. The cross-shaped form does not bear any symbolism, they are not due to aesthetic considerations, but to avoid snowdrifts. "We made a computer analysis of the dynamics of the snow currents and piled the shape of the building and the height of the piles in such a way that the entrance was not covered with snow," says Oystein Kaul Karttvedt, who was responsible for this part of the work. All the buildings stand on piles fixed in rock with a height of one to preserve the natural environment and to avoid the melting of permafrost. The entrance is oriented to the south-west and is arranged in such way as not to interfere with wild animals. In addition, the orientation is due to the fact that the wind blows from the southeast, which can lead to snowdrifts on this side, in the north of the fjord coast. All buildings are asymmetric and have different angles of facade tilt, which improves their aerodynamic characteristics.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The station control station is the heart of the observatory, it contains all the necessary infrastructure to control its operation. On the ground floor there is a garage, a workshop, a warehouse, a fresh water tank and a tank for collecting liquid waste, all rooms have a separate entrance from the outside. In the center of the second floor. From here, operators can see both the antennas and the computer room next door. Also on the second floor. The scientific station is not designed for round-the-clock work, but it is provided with a place for sleeping and a bathroom, which may be needed in case of an emergency or under special circumstances.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

The body with the laser telescope is connected to the control point of the covered passage. It consists of a working room and a room where the latest "laser" of NASA is located on the main building structure. A dome has been built above the "laser," capable of breaking the ice that can build up in the winter.

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The gravimeter is located to the north of the main observatory complex. Access to the devices is through a closed porch, from where you can observe it. As with the telescope, the instruments of the gravimeter have three separate, independent of the structure.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The covered passage is built on stilts to protect the natural environment and fauna from human activity. It connects the station control building, telescope and antennas, and is also used for a channel for routing cables from the antennas to the control point. The windows on the facades of the transition are folded into a meander.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The observatory is built in accordance with strict Norwegian energy saving standards. All buildings are made of multi-ply plywood, hermetically sealed from the outside environment and trimmed with untreated spruce planks. Over time, they will become gray and the observatory will merge with the surrounding landscape.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

Despite the fact that the main construction work was completed by the end of 2015, the observatory was opened in June 2018, and all systems should be fully earned by 2022.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund on Spitsbergen under the project LPO arkitekter.

information:

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

New Alesund is a research village on the Norwegian archipelago Spitsbergen, the northernmost civil settlement on the planet; there are about thirty permanent residents, their number of grows to 120 in the summer. It was founded in 1917 as a miner, but in 1960 coal mining was stopped, and New Alesund was redesigned from mining to scientific. At the moment, there are sixteen research stations, which are managed by scientists from ten countries. The new Earth Observatory, founded by Kartverket, the Norwegian Cartography Office, with the support of NASA, became the 17th on this list.

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Observatory is the last element of the global network of geodetic stations and navigation satellite systems. This Arctic station will produce high-precision time measurements, help track changes in the ice cover, improve the efficiency of shipping, calculate the exact distance to orbiting satellites and much more. The main tool that must fulfill all of the above is the newest laser telescope provided by NASA. To design a form for such high-tech content was entrusted to the Spitsbergen office of the LPO arkitekten bureau.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

The Earth Observatory consists of five main objects: the control room of the station, two receiving antennas of radio telescopes, a laser telescope and a gravimeter. The station, antennas and telescope are connected by covered transitions and form in the plan. The cross-shaped form does not bear any symbolism, they are not due to aesthetic considerations, but to avoid snowdrifts. "We made a computer analysis of the dynamics of the snow currents and piled the shape of the building and the height of the piles in such a way that the entrance was not covered with snow," says Oystein Kaul Karttvedt, who was responsible for this part of the work. All the buildings stand on piles fixed in rock with a height of one to preserve the natural environment and to avoid the melting of permafrost. The entrance is oriented to the south-west and is arranged in such way as not to interfere with wild animals. In addition, the orientation is due to the fact that the wind blows from the southeast, which can lead to snowdrifts on this side, in the north of the fjord coast. All buildings are asymmetric and have different angles of facade tilt, which improves their aerodynamic characteristics.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The station control station is the heart of the observatory, it contains all the necessary infrastructure to control its operation. On the ground floor there is a garage, a workshop, a warehouse, a fresh water tank and a tank for collecting liquid waste, all rooms have a separate entrance from the outside. In the center of the second floor. From here, operators can see both the antennas and the computer room next door. Also on the second floor. The scientific station is not designed for round-the-clock work, but it is provided with a place for sleeping and a bathroom, which may be needed in case of an emergency or under special circumstances.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

The body with the laser telescope is connected to the control point of the covered passage. It consists of a working room and a room where the latest "laser" of NASA is located on the main building structure. A dome has been built above the "laser," capable of breaking the ice that can build up in the winter.

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The gravimeter is located to the north of the main observatory complex. Access to the devices is through a closed porch, from where you can observe it. As with the telescope, the instruments of the gravimeter have three separate, independent of the structure.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The covered passage is built on stilts to protect the natural environment and fauna from human activity. It connects the station control building, telescope and antennas, and is also used for a channel for routing cables from the antennas to the control point. The windows on the facades of the transition are folded into a meander.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The observatory is built in accordance with strict Norwegian energy saving standards. All buildings are made of multi-ply plywood, hermetically sealed from the outside environment and trimmed with untreated spruce planks. Over time, they will become gray and the observatory will merge with the surrounding landscape.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

Despite the fact that the main construction work was completed by the end of 2015, the observatory was opened in June 2018, and all systems should be fully earned by 2022.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund on Spitsbergen under the project LPO arkitekter.

information:

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

New Alesund is a research village on the Norwegian archipelago Spitsbergen, the northernmost civil settlement on the planet; there are about 120 permanent residents, their number grows to 120 in the summer. It was founded in 1917 as a miner, but in 1960, coal mining was stopped, and New Alesund was redesigned from mining to scientific. At the moment, there are sixteen research stations, which are managed by scientists from ten countries. The new Earth Observatory, founded by Kartverket, the Norwegian Cartography Office, with the support of NASA, became the 17th on this list.

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Observatory is the last element of the global network of geodetic stations and navigation satellite systems. This Arctic station will produce high-precision time measurements, help track changes in the ice cover, improve the efficiency of shipping, calculate the exact distance to orbiting satellites and much more. The main tool that must fulfill all of the above is the newest laser telescope provided by NASA. To design a form for such high-tech content was entrusted to the Spitsbergen office of the LPO arkitekten bureau.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

The Earth Observatory consists of five main objects: the control room of the station, the two receiving antennas of the radio telescopes, a laser telescope and a gravimeter. The station, antennas and telescope are connected by covered transitions and form in the plan. The cross-shaped form does not bear any symbolism, like the orientation of the building: they are not due to aesthetic considerations, but to avoid snowdrifts. "We made a computer analysis of the dynamics of the snow currents and piled the shape of the building and the height of the piles in such a way that the entrance was not covered with snow," says Oystein Kaul Karttvedt, who was responsible for this part of the work. All the buildings stand on piles fixed in rock with a height of one meter to preserve the natural environment and to avoid the melting of permafrost. The entrance is oriented to the south-west and is arranged in such way as not to interfere with wild animals. In addition, the orientation is due to the fact that the wind mainly blows from the southeast, which can lead to snowdrifts on this side, in the north is the fjord coast. All buildings are asymmetric and have different angles of facade tilt, which improves their aerodynamic characteristics.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The station control station is the heart of the observatory, it contains all the necessary infrastructure to control its operation. On the ground floor there is a garage, a workshop, a warehouse, a fresh water tank and a tank for collecting liquid waste, all rooms have a separate entrance from the outside. In the center of the second floor. From here, operators can can see both the antennas and the computer room next door. Also on the second floor. The scientific station is not designed for round-the-clock work, but it is provided with a place for sleeping and a bathroom under special circumstances.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

The body with the laser telescope is connected to the control point of the covered passage. It consists of a working room and a room where the latest "laser" of NASA is located on the main building structure. A dome has been built above the "laser," capable of breaking the ice that can build up in the winter, opening up for the work of a scrap heap.

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The gravimeter is located to the north of the main observatory complex. From the closed porch, from where you can observe its work through a specially installed showcase. As with the telescope, the instruments of the gravimeter have three separate, independent of the structure.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The covered passage is built on stilts to protect the natural environment and fauna from human activity. It connects the station control building, telescope and antennas, and is also used as a channel for routing cables. The windows on the facades of the transition are folded into a meander – perhaps the only purely decorative, and not functional element in the project.

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

The observatory is built in accordance with strict Norwegian energy saving standards. All buildings are made of multi-ply plywood, hermetically sealed from the outside environment and trimmed with untreated spruce planks. Over time, they will become gray and the observatory will merge with the surrounding landscape.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

Despite the fact that the main construction work was completed by the end of 2015, the observatory was in June 2018, and all systems should be fully earned by 2022.

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Elisa Grinland

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund. Photo by Hanne Jørgensen

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditions

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Under ideal canned conditionsGeodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

Geodesic Observatory in New Alesund © LPO arkitekter

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