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Five volcanoes that shook the world

Five volcanoes that shook the world

Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

This unremarkable volcano was considered asleep: the last eruption happened about two hundred years ago. But on March 21, 2010 his unpronounceable name had to be learned all over the world: a huge cloud of ash blocked the air traffic over the whole of Northern Europe. For three weeks, while the eruption continued, about 100 thousand flights were canceled, and air carrier losses amounted to about 5 billion euros.

Five volcanoes that shook the world

The first volcanic eruption on the uninhabited Kuril island of Matua on June 12, 2009 was noticed by cosmonauts on the ISS.

Five volcanoes that shook the world

Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland

This unremarkable volcano was considered asleep: the last eruption happened about two hundred years ago. But on March 21, 2010 his unpronounceable name had to be learned all over the world: a huge cloud of ash blocked the air traffic over the whole of Northern Europe. For three weeks, while the eruption continued, about 100 thousand flights were canceled, and air carrier losses amounted to about 5 billion euros.

Five volcanoes that shook the world

The first volcanic eruption on the uninhabited Kuril island of Matua on June 12, 2009 was noticed by cosmonauts on the ISS.

The then-rising 8-kilometer ash cloud was already visible from neighboring Japan – the local air carrier JAL had to cancel about 20 of its flights to North America and Europe.

Five volcanoes that shook the world

The troubled neighbor of Mexico City, from the city to the volcano, is only about 80 kilometers. The last great eruption that happened on December 19, 2000, made all residents of the Mexican capital startle. Although only ashes reached the city, the pillar of the gushing lava was perfectly visible from anywhere in the capital.

The most antimilitarist volcano in history: its eruption in June 1991 in one fell swoop destroyed the US Air Force’s strategic base Clark, the largest US military facility outside the States.

On November 13, 1985, a cloud of volcanic ash rose by more than 30 kilometers, and the flooded mudflows demolished the neighboring town of Armero together with 24,000 inhabitants plus a few more villages. It is believed that this is the largest mudflow disaster in the history of mankind in terms of the number of victims.

So far, these volcanoes are silent, but there is no guarantee that Grisvotna will not be added to the roar of his newly awakened predecessors in the future. In this case, it will be impossible to fly on airplanes around the world. What is the solution? Travel on trains, buses and own car! And, yes, is not it time to resume the passenger steamer communication between the continents?

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