Styling

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Igor Kurkin designed this Moscow apartment for a fictional family of a Soviet diplomat.

Igor Kurkin

"In this project I wanted to try myself as a stage designer. To create mise-en-scenes from the entrance, – says the designer Igor Kurkin. – In the process of work, I’m constantly walking around the apartment with a camera – I checked that everything was as photogenic as possible".

The owners of the apartment, as the designer says, are creative people, gravitate towards the classics, but they are not alien to experiments. However, the interior was made not only for them: Igor designed it for a fictional family of the Soviet diplomat who managed to live abroad and now returned to his homeland, taking with him something from foreign life.

Living room. Sofa in the background, Stanley, pereobit Italian fabrics. Chandelier from the collection of Kelly Wirstler for Visual Comfort & Co. The wall protrusion hides the air duct. Igor decorated it with the arms of the USSR and the RSFSR. On the wall to the right is the mosaic leaves of Ginkgo’s work by Julia Gorbunova.

Real owners of the apartment work with Kurkin for the third time, managed to make friends with him and willingly join in this game. We, also, like Igor, like vintage furniture and flea markets – an unusual concept called for, according to author, "old things and strange objects."

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Fragment of the living room.

The plaster coat of arms of the USSR and the RSFSR in the living room above the TV, the bust of Vladimir Ilyich and, with a fair share of the conventionality, a large number of vintage furniture (we will assume that our diplomat brought it from foreign trips) is sent to the fictional Soviet past. There are also artifacts from countries. For example, a picture of an unknown Chinese artist in the living room, as well as a pair of women’s wedding caps. They are of Afghan origin, but they were bought on the street market in Tehran, where Igor happened to be accidentally, because of the emergency landing of the plane on which he was flying from the Arab Emirates to Moscow.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the living room.

In other respects, the interior is more Parisian – light walls, "French fir tree" parquet, moldings on walls, art deco elements. And of course, the layout, which has nothing in common with the arrangement of the Soviet dwellings. The apartment has an area of ​​153 m2 divided into two parts. Closer to the entrance – a public area, in the middle of which. She divides the space into the kitchen and the living room. Next – a private hall, from which the master bedroom and two children’s bedrooms branch off. One of them was done when the sex of the unborn child had not yet been determined, so Igor designed it as neutrally as possible so that if necessary, something could be changed or added. But all the other premises must survive the growth of two small "bandits" in an unchanged form.

Igor Kurkin designed this Moscow apartment for a fictional family of a Soviet diplomat.

Igor Kurkin

"In this project I wanted to try myself as a stage designer. To create mise-en-scenes from the entrance, – says the designer Igor Kurkin. – In the process of work, I’m constantly walking around the apartment with a camera – I checked that everything was as photogenic as possible".

The owners of the apartment, as the designer says, are creative people, gravitate towards the classics, but they are not alien to experiments. However, the interior was not only for them: Igor designed it for a fictional family of a Soviet diplomat who managed to live home with him something from foreign life.

Living room. Sofa in the background, Stanley, pereobit Italian fabrics. Chandelier from the collection of Kelly Wirstler for Visual Comfort & Co. The wall protrusion hides the air duct. Igor decorated it with the arms of the USSR and the RSFSR. On the wall to the right is the mosaic leaves of Ginkgo’s work by Julia Gorbunova.

Real owners of the apartment work with Kurkin for the third time, managed to make friends with him and willingly join in this game. So, we are managed to live in the different countries of the world and, like Igor, like vintage furniture and flea markets – an unusual concept called for, according to author, "old things and strange objects."

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the living room.

The plaster coat of arms of the USSR and the RSFSR in the living room above the TV, the bust of Vladimir Ilyich and, with a fair share of the conventionality, a large number of vintage furniture our diplomat brought it from foreign trips) is sent to the fictional Soviet past. There are also artifacts from countries friendly to the USSR. For example, a picture of an unknown Chinese artist in the living room, as well as a pair of women’s wedding caps. They are of Afghan origin, but they were bought on the street market in Tehran, where Igor happened to be accidentally, because of the emergency landing of the plane on which he was flying from the Arab Emirates to Moscow.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the living room.

In other respects, the interior is more Parisian – light walls, "French fir tree" parquet, moldings on walls, art deco elements. And of course, the layout, which has nothing in common with the arrangement of the Soviet dwellings. The apartment has an area of ​​153 m2 divided into two parts. Closer to the entrance – a public area, in the middle of which. She divides the space into the kitchen and the living room. Next – a private hall, from which the master bedroom and two children’s bedrooms branch off. One of them was determined, so, and so on. But all the other premises must survive the growth of two small "bandits" in an unchanged form.

Igor Kurkin designed this Moscow apartment for a fictional family of a Soviet diplomat.

Igor Kurkin

"In this project I wanted to try myself as a stage designer. To create mise-en-scenes from the entrance, – says the designer Igor Kurkin. – In the process of work, I’m constantly walking around the apartment with a camera – I checked that everything was as photogenic as possible".

The owners of the apartment, as the designer says, are creative people, gravitate towards the classics, but they are not alien to experiments. However, the interior was made not only for them: Igor designed it for a fictional family of the Soviet diplomat who managed to live abroad and now returned to his homeland, taking with him something from foreign life.

Living room. Sofa in the background, Stanley, pereobit Italian fabrics. Chandelier from the collection of Kelly Wirstler for Visual Comfort & Co. The wall protrusion hides the air duct. Igor decorated it with the arms of the USSR and the RSFSR. On the wall to the right is the mosaic leaves of Ginkgo’s work by Julia Gorbunova.

Real owners of the apartment work with Kurkin for the third time, managed to make friends with him and willingly join in this game. We, also, like Igor, like vintage furniture and flea markets – an unusual concept called for, according to author, "old things and strange objects."

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Fragment of the living room.

The plaster coat of arms of the USSR and the RSFSR in the living room above the TV, the bust of Vladimir Ilyich and, with a fair share of the conventionality, a large number of vintage furniture (we will assume that our diplomat brought it from foreign trips) is sent to the fictional Soviet past. There are also artifacts from countries. For example, a picture of an unknown Chinese artist in the living room, as well as a pair of women’s wedding caps. They are of Afghan origin, but they were bought on the street market in Tehran, where Igor happened to be accidentally, because of the emergency landing of the plane on which he was flying from the Arab Emirates to Moscow.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Fragment of the living room.

In other respects, the interior is more Parisian – light walls, "French fir tree" parquet, moldings on walls, art deco elements. And of course, the layout, which has nothing in common with the arrangement of the Soviet dwellings. The apartment has an area of ​​153 m2 divided into two parts. Closer to the entrance – a public area, in the middle of which. She divides the space into the kitchen and the living room. Next – a private hall, from which the master bedroom and two children’s bedrooms branch off. One of them was done when the sex of the unborn child had not yet been determined, so Igor designed it as neutrally as possible so that if necessary, something could be changed or added. But all the other premises must survive the growth of two small "bandits" in an unchanged form.

Igor Kurkin designed this Moscow apartment for a fictional family of a Soviet diplomat.

Igor Kurkin

"In this project I wanted to try myself as a stage designer. To create mise-en-scenes from the entrance, – says the designer Igor Kurkin. – In the process of work, I’m constantly walking around the apartment with a camera – I checked that everything was as photogenic as possible".

The owners of the apartment, as the designer says, are creative people, gravitate towards the classics, but they are not alien to experiments. However, the interior was not only for them: Igor designed it for a fictional family of a Soviet diplomat who managed to live home with him something from foreign life.

Living room. Sofa in the background, Stanley, pereobit Italian fabrics. Chandelier from the collection of Kelly Wirstler for Visual Comfort & Co. The wall protrusion hides the air duct. Igor decorated it with the arms of the USSR and the RSFSR. On the wall to the right is the mosaic leaves of Ginkgo’s work by Julia Gorbunova.

Real owners of the apartment work with Kurkin for the third time, managed to make friends with him and willingly join in this game. So, we are managed to live in the different countries of the world and, like Igor, like vintage furniture and flea markets – an unusual concept called for, according to author, "old things and strange objects."

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the living room.

The plaster coat of arms of the USSR and the RSFSR in the living room above the TV, the bust of Vladimir Ilyich and, with a fair share of the conventionality, a large number of vintage furniture our diplomat brought it from foreign trips) is sent to the fictional Soviet past. There are also artifacts from countries friendly to the USSR. For example, a picture of an unknown Chinese artist in the living room, as well as a pair of women’s wedding caps. They are of Afghan origin, but they were bought on the street market in Tehran, where Igor happened to be accidentally, because of the emergency landing of the plane on which he was flying from the Arab Emirates to Moscow.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Fragment of the living room.

In other respects, the interior is more Parisian – light walls, "French fir tree" parquet, moldings on walls, art deco elements. And of course, the layout, which has nothing in common with the arrangement of the Soviet dwellings. The apartment has an area of ​​153 m2 divided into two parts. Closer to the entrance – a public area, in the middle of which. She divides the space into the kitchen and the living room. Next – a private hall, from which the master bedroom and two children’s bedrooms branch off. One of them was determined, so, and so on. But all the other premises must survive the growth of two small "bandits" in an unchanged form.

Fragment of the living room.

Covers on furniture are sewn so that they were easy to change. Stucco designer always and everywhere uses only gypsum, because it can be restored as necessary, as well as marble surfaces. On the floor there is a brushed wood, there are no scratches on it. On the plaster, which is covered with facades, you can draw, and the quartz even dance on them. So, for all its external refinement, the interior, as Igor says, is not killed. Continuing the game he invented, we will consider this a complete and unconditional victory of the Soviet diplomacy.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowThe picture of an unknown Chinese artist Igor after a long persuasion bought from the decorator Anna Erman, who at one time found this work on some flea market. Chest of 1932 Igor looked at the Repeat Story for himself, but reluctantly put in this interior.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

The facades of the kitchen Leicht are covered with plaster, imitating concrete. Marble table, Restoration Hardware. Design chairs by Charles Rennie Mackintosh from Repeat Story. The hostess jokingly calls this space "a kitchen for preparing frogs." A piece of raw meat and a misted shtoof with vodka is a tribute to the legend of a Soviet diplomat.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Fragment of the bedroom.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowAbove the bed in the master bedroom. Lamp, Visual Comfort & Co.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowArmchair of 1955 from Repeat Story. The bust of Lenin is the work of Yevgeny Vuchetich.

The owner of this bedroom is a young football player. Under these conditions, an American chandelier appeared under the ceiling. Wallpaper, Cole & Son; carpet, Dovlet House. All knobs on the doors of the built-in cabinets are different. "To the child was more interesting," – explains Igor.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the children’s room.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowThe room of the youngest son. Built-in furniture is made to order. Carpet, Dovlet House. The cot moved to the apartment from the dacha, it went to the youngest child as a legacy from the elder.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the dressing room. Above the American chest of drawers is the graphic of Konstantin Akimov.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

View from the hallway to the living room. In the foreground the work of an unknown artist, bought at Vernissage in Izmailovo. "Guests should be greeted with songs and dances," Igor says. On the wall in the living room is one of Janssen’s paired lithographs. Sofas, Hickory White. Console table by the design of Igor Kurkin. A floor lamp with a roach instead of a lampshade helps the hostess to embroider.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

Fragment of the bathroom.

Apartment with Soviet past in MoscowFragment of the bathroom.

Apartment with Soviet past in Moscow

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